skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Anon Óldr 8I

Kate Heslop (ed.) 2012, ‘Anonymous Poems, Óláfs drápa Tryggvasonar 8’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1039.

Anonymous PoemsÓláfs drápa Tryggvasonar
789

Snarr ‘The swift’

snarr (adj.): gallant, bold

kennings

Snarr mǫtuðr sárlóms
‘The swift feeder of the wound-loon ’
   = WARRIOR

the wound-loon → RAVEN/EAGLE
The swift feeder of the RAVEN/EAGLE → WARRIOR
Close

sár ‘of the wound’

2. sár (noun n.; °-s; -): wound < sárlómr (noun m.)

kennings

Snarr mǫtuðr sárlóms
‘The swift feeder of the wound-loon ’
   = WARRIOR

the wound-loon → RAVEN/EAGLE
The swift feeder of the RAVEN/EAGLE → WARRIOR

notes

[2] sárlóms ‘of the wound-loon’: Lómr m. is Columbus arcticus (CVC: lómr), the Arctic loon or black-throated diver. 

Close

sár ‘of the wound’

2. sár (noun n.; °-s; -): wound < sárlómr (noun m.)

kennings

Snarr mǫtuðr sárlóms
‘The swift feeder of the wound-loon ’
   = WARRIOR

the wound-loon → RAVEN/EAGLE
The swift feeder of the RAVEN/EAGLE → WARRIOR

notes

[2] sárlóms ‘of the wound-loon’: Lómr m. is Columbus arcticus (CVC: lómr), the Arctic loon or black-throated diver. 

Close

lóms ‘loon’

1. lómr (noun m.): loon < sárlómr (noun m.)

kennings

Snarr mǫtuðr sárlóms
‘The swift feeder of the wound-loon ’
   = WARRIOR

the wound-loon → RAVEN/EAGLE
The swift feeder of the RAVEN/EAGLE → WARRIOR

notes

[2] sárlóms ‘of the wound-loon’: Lómr m. is Columbus arcticus (CVC: lómr), the Arctic loon or black-throated diver. 

Close

lóms ‘loon’

1. lómr (noun m.): loon < sárlómr (noun m.)

kennings

Snarr mǫtuðr sárlóms
‘The swift feeder of the wound-loon ’
   = WARRIOR

the wound-loon → RAVEN/EAGLE
The swift feeder of the RAVEN/EAGLE → WARRIOR

notes

[2] sárlóms ‘of the wound-loon’: Lómr m. is Columbus arcticus (CVC: lómr), the Arctic loon or black-throated diver. 

Close

mǫtuðr ‘feeder’

mǫtuðr (noun m.): [feeder]

[2] mǫtuðr: mǫtuð Bb

kennings

Snarr mǫtuðr sárlóms
‘The swift feeder of the wound-loon ’
   = WARRIOR

the wound-loon → RAVEN/EAGLE
The swift feeder of the RAVEN/EAGLE → WARRIOR

notes

[2] mǫtuðr ‘feeder’: A minor emendation, yielding a hap. leg. agent noun formed from mata ‘to feed’ (CVC, ONP: mata; LP: mǫtuðr).

Close

hregg ‘of the storm’

hregg (noun n.): storm < hreggbjóðr (noun m.)

kennings

randa hreggbjóðr
‘storm-offerer of shields’
   = WARRIOR

the storm of shields → BATTLE
the offerer of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

hregg ‘of the storm’

hregg (noun n.): storm < hreggbjóðr (noun m.)

kennings

randa hreggbjóðr
‘storm-offerer of shields’
   = WARRIOR

the storm of shields → BATTLE
the offerer of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

bjóðr ‘the offerer’

2. bjóðr (noun m.): inviter < hreggbjóðr (noun m.)

kennings

randa hreggbjóðr
‘storm-offerer of shields’
   = WARRIOR

the storm of shields → BATTLE
the offerer of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

hvar ‘whatever’

hvar (adv.): where

Close

randa ‘of shields’

rǫnd (noun f.; °dat. -/-u; rendr/randir): shield, shield-rim

[4] randa: ‘rada’ Bb

kennings

randa hreggbjóðr
‘storm-offerer of shields’
   = WARRIOR

the storm of shields → BATTLE
the offerer of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[4] randa ‘of shields’: Emendation (see Sveinbjörn Egilsson 1832, 10) is necessary here to restore aðalhending (randa : lands) and because hreggbjóðr ‘storm-offerer’ is not in itself a complete warrior-kenning.

Close

randa ‘of shields’

rǫnd (noun f.; °dat. -/-u; rendr/randir): shield, shield-rim

[4] randa: ‘rada’ Bb

kennings

randa hreggbjóðr
‘storm-offerer of shields’
   = WARRIOR

the storm of shields → BATTLE
the offerer of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[4] randa ‘of shields’: Emendation (see Sveinbjörn Egilsson 1832, 10) is necessary here to restore aðalhending (randa : lands) and because hreggbjóðr ‘storm-offerer’ is not in itself a complete warrior-kenning.

Close

ok ‘and’

3. ok (conj.): and, but; also

notes

[5] ok; vestan ‘and; from the west’: The two words clearly belong to different clauses, but the caesura in such a position is unusual at best (a parallel is found in SnSt Ht 15/3III). Skj B construes vel ok drengila ‘well and bravely’ together, but as Kock points out this is syntactically forced. Kock (NN §1217) favours reading ok or auk as an adv., hence ‘plentiful food was also provided most bravely’.

Close

vestan ‘from the west’

vestan (prep.): from the west

notes

[5] ok; vestan ‘and; from the west’: The two words clearly belong to different clauses, but the caesura in such a position is unusual at best (a parallel is found in SnSt Ht 15/3III). Skj B construes vel ok drengila ‘well and bravely’ together, but as Kock points out this is syntactically forced. Kock (NN §1217) favours reading ok or auk as an adv., hence ‘plentiful food was also provided most bravely’.

Close

fengin ‘provided’

2. fá (verb; °fǽr; fekk, fengu; fenginn): get, receive

[6] fengin: fenginn Bb

notes

[6] fengin ‘provided’: See Note to st. 7/8 vápnbautinn ‘weapon-beaten’.

Close

mærr ‘the glorious’

2. mærr (adj.): famous

Close

marg ‘very’

2. margr (adj.; °-an): many < margspakr (adj.): sagacious, very wise

notes

[8] margspakr ‘very wise’: Ms. ‘margspaín’, read as margspáinn (Gullberg 1875), would mean ‘much-prophesying’, qualifying mildingr ‘prince’, i.e. Óláfr. However, since prophecy was regarded with suspicion by most Christian writers, this seems unlikely, as does (with slight emendation) margspám vargi ‘to the very foresightful wolf’ (Sveinbjörn Egilsson 1832, 10, 20). The better solution therefore seems emendation to margspakr ‘very wise’ (so Skj B; Skald). The reading ‘spaín’ could have been influenced by the (also corrupt) ‘graín’.

Close

spakr ‘wise’

spakr (adj.): quiet, gentle, wise < margspakr (adj.): sagacious, very wise

[8] ‑spakr: ‘‑spaín’ Bb

notes

[8] margspakr ‘very wise’: Ms. ‘margspaín’, read as margspáinn (Gullberg 1875), would mean ‘much-prophesying’, qualifying mildingr ‘prince’, i.e. Óláfr. However, since prophecy was regarded with suspicion by most Christian writers, this seems unlikely, as does (with slight emendation) margspám vargi ‘to the very foresightful wolf’ (Sveinbjörn Egilsson 1832, 10, 20). The better solution therefore seems emendation to margspakr ‘very wise’ (so Skj B; Skald). The reading ‘spaín’ could have been influenced by the (also corrupt) ‘graín’.

Close

grôum ‘for the grey’

grár (adj.; °gráan/grán): grey

[8] grôum: ‘graín’ Bb

notes

[8] grôum ‘grey’: The emendation, adopted by previous eds, is minor if ms. ‘graín’ is assumed to be an error for ‘gram’, normalised grôum, caused by confusion of ‘m’ and ‘in’; cf. ‘ofaín’ for ófôum in st. 21/4.  — [8] margspakr ‘very wise’: Ms. ‘margspaín’, read as margspáinn (Gullberg 1875), would mean ‘much-prophesying’, qualifying mildingr ‘prince’, i.e. Óláfr. However, since prophecy was regarded with suspicion by most Christian writers, this seems unlikely, as does (with slight emendation) margspám vargi ‘to the very foresightful wolf’ (Sveinbjörn Egilsson 1832, 10, 20). The better solution therefore seems emendation to margspakr ‘very wise’ (so Skj B; Skald). The reading ‘spaín’ could have been influenced by the (also corrupt) ‘graín’.

Close

grôum ‘for the grey’

grár (adj.; °gráan/grán): grey

[8] grôum: ‘graín’ Bb

notes

[8] grôum ‘grey’: The emendation, adopted by previous eds, is minor if ms. ‘graín’ is assumed to be an error for ‘gram’, normalised grôum, caused by confusion of ‘m’ and ‘in’; cf. ‘ofaín’ for ófôum in st. 21/4.  — [8] margspakr ‘very wise’: Ms. ‘margspaín’, read as margspáinn (Gullberg 1875), would mean ‘much-prophesying’, qualifying mildingr ‘prince’, i.e. Óláfr. However, since prophecy was regarded with suspicion by most Christian writers, this seems unlikely, as does (with slight emendation) margspám vargi ‘to the very foresightful wolf’ (Sveinbjörn Egilsson 1832, 10, 20). The better solution therefore seems emendation to margspakr ‘very wise’ (so Skj B; Skald). The reading ‘spaín’ could have been influenced by the (also corrupt) ‘graín’.

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.