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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Anon Nkt 51II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Anonymous Poems, Nóregs konungatal 51’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 793.

Anonymous PoemsNóregs konungatal
505152

Ósló ‘of Oslo’

Ósló (noun f.): [Oslo]

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Nú ‘Now’

nú (adv.): now

[5] Nú: ný Flat

notes

[5] nú ‘now’: In this context, the ms. reading ‘new’ makes little sense. The emendation follows previous eds. — [5] nú grœr jǫrð ‘now earth grows’: This statement is incorrect, because Sigurðr was interred in the stone wall of the church, outside the choir on the south side (ÍF 28, 276). According to Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 28, 276-7 n. 6), this royal burial custom is not attested elsewhere, and he suggests that Sigurðr and his men may have seen such tombs during their journey to Palestine. Other kings who were entombed similarly in Hallvardskirken were Sigurðr’s son, Magnús inn blindi ‘the Blind’ (d. 1139), Ingi Haraldsson (d. 1161) and Hákon ungi ‘the Young’ Hákonarson (d. 1257).

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Nú ‘Now’

nú (adv.): now

[5] Nú: ný Flat

notes

[5] nú ‘now’: In this context, the ms. reading ‘new’ makes little sense. The emendation follows previous eds. — [5] nú grœr jǫrð ‘now earth grows’: This statement is incorrect, because Sigurðr was interred in the stone wall of the church, outside the choir on the south side (ÍF 28, 276). According to Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 28, 276-7 n. 6), this royal burial custom is not attested elsewhere, and he suggests that Sigurðr and his men may have seen such tombs during their journey to Palestine. Other kings who were entombed similarly in Hallvardskirken were Sigurðr’s son, Magnús inn blindi ‘the Blind’ (d. 1139), Ingi Haraldsson (d. 1161) and Hákon ungi ‘the Young’ Hákonarson (d. 1257).

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grœr ‘grows’

2. gróa (verb): grow

notes

[5] nú grœr jǫrð ‘now earth grows’: This statement is incorrect, because Sigurðr was interred in the stone wall of the church, outside the choir on the south side (ÍF 28, 276). According to Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 28, 276-7 n. 6), this royal burial custom is not attested elsewhere, and he suggests that Sigurðr and his men may have seen such tombs during their journey to Palestine. Other kings who were entombed similarly in Hallvardskirken were Sigurðr’s son, Magnús inn blindi ‘the Blind’ (d. 1139), Ingi Haraldsson (d. 1161) and Hákon ungi ‘the Young’ Hákonarson (d. 1257).

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jǫrð ‘earth’

jǫrð (noun f.; °jarðar, dat. -u; jarðir/jarðar(DN I (1367) 304Š)): ground, earth

notes

[5] nú grœr jǫrð ‘now earth grows’: This statement is incorrect, because Sigurðr was interred in the stone wall of the church, outside the choir on the south side (ÍF 28, 276). According to Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 28, 276-7 n. 6), this royal burial custom is not attested elsewhere, and he suggests that Sigurðr and his men may have seen such tombs during their journey to Palestine. Other kings who were entombed similarly in Hallvardskirken were Sigurðr’s son, Magnús inn blindi ‘the Blind’ (d. 1139), Ingi Haraldsson (d. 1161) and Hákon ungi ‘the Young’ Hákonarson (d. 1257).

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jǫfurs ‘the prince’s’

jǫfurr (noun m.): ruler, prince

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Sigurðr was the first Norw. king to be buried in Hallvardskirken (Hallvarðskirkja, the Church of S. Hallvarðr) in Oslo. See Ágr (ÍF 29, 51), Mork 1928-32, 400, Fsk (ÍF 29, 321), MsonaHkr (ÍF 28, 276).

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