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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Anon Nkt 31II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Anonymous Poems, Nóregs konungatal 31’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 781.

Anonymous PoemsNóregs konungatal
303132

raun ‘true testimony’

raun (noun f.; °-ar; -ir): ordeal, proof, experience

notes

[1] raun ‘true testimony’: For the earliest accounts of the miracles of S. Óláfr, see Acta Sancti Olavi regis et martyris (MHN 125-44) and Einarr Skúlason’s poem Geisli (ESk GeislVII). See also Þórarinn loftunga’s Glælognskviða (Þloft GlækvI).

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ræsir ‘the ruler’

ræsir (noun m.): ruler

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Stendr ‘stands’

standa (verb): stand

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heilagt ‘a holy’

heilagr (adj.; °helgan; compar. -ari, superl. -astr): holy, sacred

notes

[7] heilagt skrín ‘a holy shrine’: This particular shrine was commissioned by Óláfr’s son, Magnús inn góði. Snorri, who must have seen the shrine when he visited Norway, gives the following description (ÍF 28, 20): Magnús konungr lét gera skrín ok búa gulli ok silfri ok setja steinum. En skrín þat var svá gǫrt bæði at mikilleik ok at ǫðrum vexti sem líkkista, en svalir undir niðri, en yfir uppi vétt vaxit sem ræfr ok þar af upp hǫfuð ok burst. Eru á véttinu lamar á bak, en hespur fyrir ok þar læst með lukli ‘King Magnús had a shrine made and had it adorned with gold and silver and encrusted with precious stones. And that shrine was made like a coffin, both in terms of size and shape. There were porticos on the lower part and on top there was a lid in the shape of a roof and dragon-heads rising up from it and a ridge. On the lid there are hinges in the back and hasps in the front and there it is locked with a key’. The shrine, which contained the coffin of S. Óláfr, was destroyed during the Reformation. See also Sigv ErfÓl 24I.

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skrín ‘shrine’

skrín (noun n.; °-s; -): shrine

notes

[7] heilagt skrín ‘a holy shrine’: This particular shrine was commissioned by Óláfr’s son, Magnús inn góði. Snorri, who must have seen the shrine when he visited Norway, gives the following description (ÍF 28, 20): Magnús konungr lét gera skrín ok búa gulli ok silfri ok setja steinum. En skrín þat var svá gǫrt bæði at mikilleik ok at ǫðrum vexti sem líkkista, en svalir undir niðri, en yfir uppi vétt vaxit sem ræfr ok þar af upp hǫfuð ok burst. Eru á véttinu lamar á bak, en hespur fyrir ok þar læst með lukli ‘King Magnús had a shrine made and had it adorned with gold and silver and encrusted with precious stones. And that shrine was made like a coffin, both in terms of size and shape. There were porticos on the lower part and on top there was a lid in the shape of a roof and dragon-heads rising up from it and a ridge. On the lid there are hinges in the back and hasps in the front and there it is locked with a key’. The shrine, which contained the coffin of S. Óláfr, was destroyed during the Reformation. See also Sigv ErfÓl 24I.

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Haralds ‘Haraldr’s’

Haraldr (noun m.): Haraldr

kennings

arfa Haralds.
‘Haraldr’s heir.’
   = Óláfr

Haraldr’s heir. → Óláfr
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arfa ‘heir’

arfi (noun m.; °-a; -ar): heir, heiress

kennings

arfa Haralds.
‘Haraldr’s heir.’
   = Óláfr

Haraldr’s heir. → Óláfr
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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Kristkirken (Kristkirkja, Christ’s Church) in Trondheim, which housed the shrine of S. Óláfr, was erected by Óláfr kyrri Haraldsson, Óláfr’s nephew and namesake. The church was originally dedicated to the Holy Trinity (see Theodoricus, MHN 58; ÍF 28, 208). For the fate of Óláfr’s body after it was disinterred, see ÓHHkr (ÍF 27, 403-5).

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