Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Sigv Austv 6I

R. D. Fulk (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Austrfararvísur 6’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 592.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonAustrfararvísur
567

hafa ‘three’

hafa (verb): have

[1] hafa: haf Bb

Close

hnekkt ‘driven [me] away’

hnekkja (verb): drive off, reject

[1] hnekkt: ‘hnek[…]’ R686ˣ

Close

hnakka ‘their backs’

hnakki (noun m.; °-a): neck

Close

hein ‘of the whetstone’

hein (noun f.; °-ar): whetstone < heinflet (noun n.)hein (noun f.; °-ar): whetstone < heinfell (noun n.)

kennings

þollar heinflets
‘the firs of the whetstone-platform ’
   = MEN

the whetstone-platform → SWORD
the firs of the SWORD → MEN
Close

hein ‘of the whetstone’

hein (noun f.; °-ar): whetstone < heinflet (noun n.)hein (noun f.; °-ar): whetstone < heinfell (noun n.)

kennings

þollar heinflets
‘the firs of the whetstone-platform ’
   = MEN

the whetstone-platform → SWORD
the firs of the SWORD → MEN
Close

flets ‘platform’

flet (noun n.): platform, floor < heinflet (noun n.)

[2] ‑flets: ‘fellz’ Flat

kennings

þollar heinflets
‘the firs of the whetstone-platform ’
   = MEN

the whetstone-platform → SWORD
the firs of the SWORD → MEN
Close

flets ‘platform’

flet (noun n.): platform, floor < heinflet (noun n.)

[2] ‑flets: ‘fellz’ Flat

kennings

þollar heinflets
‘the firs of the whetstone-platform ’
   = MEN

the whetstone-platform → SWORD
the firs of the SWORD → MEN
Close

mér ‘me’

ek (pron.; °mín, dat. mér, acc. mik): I, me

notes

[2] mér ‘me’: Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) sets the word off by commas, indicating that he takes it to be the expressed object of hafa hnekkt ‘have driven away’ in l. 1, and the implied object of við ‘against’ in l. 2. Mér is similarly assumed to have a dual role in this edn, though a less disjointed word order is proposed. Cf. Noreen (1923, 37-8), and Kock, NN §1112.

Close

þeigi ‘’

Close

þeygi ‘not at all’

þeygi (adv.): not at all

[3] þeygi: ‘þeigi’ Kˣ

notes

[3, 4] þeygi bella … tíri ‘not at all do … display praiseworthiness’: This is the sense normally assumed, i.e. that the three Ǫlvirs have acted badly. Konráð Gíslason (1892, 178) cites parallel instances of tírr in this concrete sense. Kock (NN §2218B) compiles poetic instances of bella in an attempt to show that with an instr. object (including the present context) it means ‘go about, perform, be intent upon’, while with a dat. one it means ‘hit, get at’, i.e. ‘reach one’s mark’ (though of course dat. and instr. objects are formally indistinguishable).

Close

bella ‘display’

1. bella (verb; °præt. sg. ball): deal with

notes

[3, 4] þeygi bella … tíri ‘not at all do … display praiseworthiness’: This is the sense normally assumed, i.e. that the three Ǫlvirs have acted badly. Konráð Gíslason (1892, 178) cites parallel instances of tírr in this concrete sense. Kock (NN §2218B) compiles poetic instances of bella in an attempt to show that with an instr. object (including the present context) it means ‘go about, perform, be intent upon’, while with a dat. one it means ‘hit, get at’, i.e. ‘reach one’s mark’ (though of course dat. and instr. objects are formally indistinguishable).

Close

þollar ‘the firs’

þollr (noun m.): fir-tree

kennings

þollar heinflets
‘the firs of the whetstone-platform ’
   = MEN

the whetstone-platform → SWORD
the firs of the SWORD → MEN
Close

þre ‘’

Close

þrír ‘name’

þrír (num. cardinal): three

[4] þrír: ‘þre’ R686ˣ, þeir 75a, 68

Close

san ‘’

Close

tíri ‘praiseworthiness’

tírr (noun m.; °-s): glory, honour

[4] tíri: fleiri 75a, eiri 68, tíði Flat

notes

[3, 4] þeygi bella … tíri ‘not at all do … display praiseworthiness’: This is the sense normally assumed, i.e. that the three Ǫlvirs have acted badly. Konráð Gíslason (1892, 178) cites parallel instances of tírr in this concrete sense. Kock (NN §2218B) compiles poetic instances of bella in an attempt to show that with an instr. object (including the present context) it means ‘go about, perform, be intent upon’, while with a dat. one it means ‘hit, get at’, i.e. ‘reach one’s mark’ (though of course dat. and instr. objects are formally indistinguishable).

Close

Þó ‘However’

þó (adv.): though

[5] Þó: nú 73aˣ

Close

séumk ‘I fear’

[5] séumk: sé ek 75a, 73aˣ, sjám Flat, sáum Tóm

notes

[5] séumk ‘I fear’: The skothending consists of long vowels (or diphthongs) without any consonant rhyme here, in Sigv Lv 24/1, and in six even lines by Sigvatr: see Höskuldur Þráinsson (1970, 12, 20); Kristján Árnason (1991, 99). Kock (NN §2923) suggests emending to þéumk, taking this to mean ‘I torment myself’ (producing a skothending of þó þ- : hlœð-), and other emendations were proposed by Jón Þorkelsson (1884, 68) and Gering (1912, 138). 

Close

hlœðir ‘loader’

hlœðir (noun m.): loader

[5] hlœðir: ‘hlæíðir’ 73aˣ, hlœði 61

kennings

hlœðir hafskíðs, [e]s
‘loader of the ocean-ski ’
   = SEAFARER

the ocean-ski → SHIP
loader of the SHIP → SEAFARER
Close

haf ‘of the ocean’

haf (noun n.; °-s; *-): sea < hafskíð (noun n.)haf (noun n.; °-s; *-): sea < hafskíð (noun n.)

kennings

hlœðir hafskíðs, [e]s
‘loader of the ocean-ski ’
   = SEAFARER

the ocean-ski → SHIP
loader of the SHIP → SEAFARER
Close

haf ‘of the ocean’

haf (noun n.; °-s; *-): sea < hafskíð (noun n.)haf (noun n.; °-s; *-): sea < hafskíð (noun n.)

kennings

hlœðir hafskíðs, [e]s
‘loader of the ocean-ski ’
   = SEAFARER

the ocean-ski → SHIP
loader of the SHIP → SEAFARER
Close

skíðs ‘ski’

skíð (noun n.; °; -): ski < hafskíð (noun n.)

[6] ‑skíðs: ‑skíð R686ˣ, Tóm

kennings

hlœðir hafskíðs, [e]s
‘loader of the ocean-ski ’
   = SEAFARER

the ocean-ski → SHIP
loader of the SHIP → SEAFARER
Close

skíðs ‘ski’

skíð (noun n.; °; -): ski < hafskíð (noun n.)

[6] ‑skíðs: ‑skíð R686ˣ, Tóm

kennings

hlœðir hafskíðs, [e]s
‘loader of the ocean-ski ’
   = SEAFARER

the ocean-ski → SHIP
loader of the SHIP → SEAFARER
Close

myni ‘will’

munu (verb): will, must

[6] myni: mœni 325VII

Close

síðan ‘henceforth’

síðan (adv.): later, then

[6] síðan: síðla 972ˣ(178va)

notes

[6] síðan ‘henceforth’: The word is construed with séumk ‘I fear’ in Skj B.

Close

hverrs ‘every’

2. hverr (pron.): who, whom, each, every

[7] hverrs (‘hverr er’): hverr 325VI, Flat

Close

avlyer ‘’

Close

Ǫlvir ‘Ǫlvir’

Ǫlvir (noun m.): Ǫlvir

[7] Ǫlvir: ‘avlyer’ R686ˣ

notes

[7] Ǫlvir: Hollander favours an etymology of *aluwīhaz ‘guardian, or priest, of a fane’ and suggests an ironic allusion to the nearly homonymous ǫlværr ‘hospitable’ (Hollander 1945, 155 n., following de Vries 1932-3, 171-2, 176-8, who argued that coincidence was implausible). The incident is thus to that extent fictitious and the name chosen solely for its entertainment value. For objections to this view see Ellekilde (1933-4, 183-5) and for a reply, see de Vries (1933-4, 292-3).

Close

heitir ‘is named’

2. heita (verb): be called, promise

[7] heitir: heitr R686ˣ

Close

alls ‘all’

allr (adj.): all

Close

gestri ‘’

Close

gesti ‘strangers’

gestr (noun m.): guest, stranger

[8] gesti: ‘gestri’ R686ˣ

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

The next evening Sigvatr comes to three farmers, each named Ǫlvir, and all turn him away. Sigvatr speaks this stanza.

[1, 2] settu hnakka við mér ‘turned their backs on me’: Lit. ‘set the napes of their necks against me’. — [2] heinflets ‘of the whetstone-platform [SWORD]’: The word flet referred originally to the floor of a house (cf. flatr ‘flat’), though it is attested only in the metaphorical senses ‘set of rooms, house, raised platform, bed (on the floor)’. It may be the last of these meanings that is intended, given the parallel sword-kenning beðr ryðfjónar ‘bed of the rust-enemy [WHETSTONE > SWORD]’ (Anon (ÓT) 6/1, 3; see Meissner 155, 163). In view of the kenning gætir grefs ‘minder of the hoe [FARMER]’ in st. 7/5, de Vries (1932-3, 172) suggests that heinflet may refer not to a sword but to a sickle, but this fits expected patterns less well.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.