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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Bjbp Jóms 27I

Emily Lethbridge (ed.) 2012, ‘Bjarni byskup Kolbeinsson, Jómsvíkingadrápa 27’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 983.

Bjarni byskup KolbeinssonJómsvíkingadrápa
262728

allri ‘all’

allr (adj.): all

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él ‘the storm’

él (noun n.; °; dat. -um): storm

kennings

él stála
‘the storm of steel weapons ’
   = BATTLE

the storm of steel weapons → BATTLE
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gnúði ‘roared’

gnýja (verb): roar

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stála ‘of steel weapons’

1. stál (noun n.; °-s; -): steel, weapon, prow

kennings

él stála
‘the storm of steel weapons ’
   = BATTLE

the storm of steel weapons → BATTLE
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spann ‘kicked’

3. spenna (verb): (strong)

notes

[3] spann ‘kicked’: The 3rd pers. sg. pret. indic. of sperna ‘spurn, kick with the feet’. Ms. spann is retained here, as an assimilated by-form of sparn (see CVC: sperna; ANG §272. 2 Anm. 2). A minor emendation produces the more familiar form sparn (so LP (1860): sperna; also Jvs 1879; Skj B; Skald). Line 3 is discussed in the Note to RvHbreiðm Hl 28/6III.

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Góð ‘The good’

góðr (adj.): good

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kemr ‘’

koma (verb; kem, kom/kvam, kominn): come

[5] kemr grimmu: abbrev. as ‘k̄ gri’ R

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grimmu ‘cruel’

grimmr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): fierce

[5] kemr grimmu: abbrev. as ‘k̄ gri’ R

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í ‘on’

í (prep.): in, into

notes

[6] í bug snœrum ‘on the curve of the spear-thongs’: Bugr is ‘bend, bight, (inner) curve, concave side’, e.g. í bug hringinum ‘the inside curve of the ring’ (CVC: bugr). Snœri is related to snœra ‘to tie, twist’ (AEW: snœra), and denotes a cable, cord or thong of various sorts. In battle contexts, it normally denotes the thongs by which spears are held (ÞjóðA Magnfl 17/6II, and cf. the compounds snœrispjót, snœridarr ‘thonged spear’, LP: snœri), so that this seems the most likely sense here, and it is assumed in Fms 12 and Skj B. Contextually, though, a bow-string would also be an attractive possibility.

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bug ‘the curve’

bugr (noun m.; °dat. -/-i): hollow, bend

notes

[6] í bug snœrum ‘on the curve of the spear-thongs’: Bugr is ‘bend, bight, (inner) curve, concave side’, e.g. í bug hringinum ‘the inside curve of the ring’ (CVC: bugr). Snœri is related to snœra ‘to tie, twist’ (AEW: snœra), and denotes a cable, cord or thong of various sorts. In battle contexts, it normally denotes the thongs by which spears are held (ÞjóðA Magnfl 17/6II, and cf. the compounds snœrispjót, snœridarr ‘thonged spear’, LP: snœri), so that this seems the most likely sense here, and it is assumed in Fms 12 and Skj B. Contextually, though, a bow-string would also be an attractive possibility.

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snœrum ‘of the spear-thongs’

snœri (noun n.; °; -): cable, thong

notes

[6] í bug snœrum ‘on the curve of the spear-thongs’: Bugr is ‘bend, bight, (inner) curve, concave side’, e.g. í bug hringinum ‘the inside curve of the ring’ (CVC: bugr). Snœri is related to snœra ‘to tie, twist’ (AEW: snœra), and denotes a cable, cord or thong of various sorts. In battle contexts, it normally denotes the thongs by which spears are held (ÞjóðA Magnfl 17/6II, and cf. the compounds snœrispjót, snœridarr ‘thonged spear’, LP: snœri), so that this seems the most likely sense here, and it is assumed in Fms 12 and Skj B. Contextually, though, a bow-string would also be an attractive possibility.

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gunn ‘extremely battle’

gunnr (noun f.): battle < gunnrakkr (adj.)

notes

[7] gunnrakkastir ‘extremely battle-bold’: Cf. st. 10/6 ógnrakkastir ‘extremely terror-bold’ or ‘battle-bold’, of the Jómsvíkingar. On the strong adj. here, see Note to st. 7/3, 4.

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rakkastir ‘bold’

rakkr (adj.; °compar. -ari): bold < gunnrakkr (adj.)

notes

[7] gunnrakkastir ‘extremely battle-bold’: Cf. st. 10/6 ógnrakkastir ‘extremely terror-bold’ or ‘battle-bold’, of the Jómsvíkingar. On the strong adj. here, see Note to st. 7/3, 4.

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gœðings ‘of a chieftain’

gœðingr (noun m.): chieftain

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Lines 1, 4, 5 and 8 form the fourth appearance of the stef ‘refrain’; see Introduction.

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