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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Anon Sól 57VII

Carolyne Larrington and Peter Robinson (eds) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Sólarljóð 57’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 336-7.

Anonymous PoemsSólarljóð
565758

þagði ‘fell silent’

þegja (verb): be silent

[1] þagði: þagnaði 10575ˣ

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vötn ‘the waters’

vatn (noun n.; °-s; -*): water, lake

[2] vötn: víti papp15ˣ

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stöðvaði ‘stood still’

stǫðva (verb): stop

[2] stöðvaði: stöðvaðiz 10575ˣ

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heyrða ‘heard’

2. heyra (verb): hear

[3] heyrða: so papp15ˣ, 738ˣ, 167b 6ˣ, 214ˣ, 1441ˣ, 10575ˣ, heyrði 166bˣ, 2797ˣ

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grimligan ‘a terrible’

grimmligr (adj.): terrible, fierce

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svip ‘treacherous’

svipr (noun m.): swinging, violent < svipvíss (adj.)

notes

[5] svipvísar konur ‘treacherous women’: Falk (1914, 39-40) argues that these women have been practising magic and that the rýgjar blóði ‘ogress’s blood’ of 59/6 connects these women to the men who must walk on red-hot paths in that st., but there is no clear evidence of what the women’s sin is.

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vísar ‘’

1. víss (adj.): wise, certain(ly) < svipvíss (adj.)

notes

[5] svipvísar konur ‘treacherous women’: Falk (1914, 39-40) argues that these women have been practising magic and that the rýgjar blóði ‘ogress’s blood’ of 59/6 connects these women to the men who must walk on red-hot paths in that st., but there is no clear evidence of what the women’s sin is.

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konur ‘women’

kona (noun f.; °-u; -ur/-r(KlmA1980 116¹¹), gen. pl. kvenna/kvinna): woman

notes

[5] svipvísar konur ‘treacherous women’: Falk (1914, 39-40) argues that these women have been practising magic and that the rýgjar blóði ‘ogress’s blood’ of 59/6 connects these women to the men who must walk on red-hot paths in that st., but there is no clear evidence of what the women’s sin is.

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moluðu ‘were crushing’

mola (verb): [were crushing]

[6] moluðu: ‘moto’ 10575ˣ, mólu 2797ˣ

notes

[6] moluðu ‘they were crushing’: The reading of the majority of mss, 3rd pers. pret. pl. of mola (weak verb) ‘to crush, break into small pieces’. 2797ˣ has mólu, 3rd pers. pret, pl. of mala (strong verb, class 6) ‘to grind’, and this probable emendation (reportedly first suggested by Jón Olafsson of Grunnavík – so Bugge and Skj A) has been adopted by almost all eds. It reduces the syllable count of the l., even though it still has too many alliterating staves. — [6] moluðu mold til matar ‘they were crushing earth into food’: Cf. Grott where the giantesses Fenja and Menja are condemned to grind out gold from a magic mill. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 88-9) notes that earth does not need grinding (though it may need crushing!), and that this is therefore an unending task. A similar punishment appears in the ‘Vision of the Monk of Wenlock’ (Tangl 1916, 13).

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moluðu ‘were crushing’

mola (verb): [were crushing]

[6] moluðu: ‘moto’ 10575ˣ, mólu 2797ˣ

notes

[6] moluðu ‘they were crushing’: The reading of the majority of mss, 3rd pers. pret. pl. of mola (weak verb) ‘to crush, break into small pieces’. 2797ˣ has mólu, 3rd pers. pret, pl. of mala (strong verb, class 6) ‘to grind’, and this probable emendation (reportedly first suggested by Jón Olafsson of Grunnavík – so Bugge and Skj A) has been adopted by almost all eds. It reduces the syllable count of the l., even though it still has too many alliterating staves. — [6] moluðu mold til matar ‘they were crushing earth into food’: Cf. Grott where the giantesses Fenja and Menja are condemned to grind out gold from a magic mill. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 88-9) notes that earth does not need grinding (though it may need crushing!), and that this is therefore an unending task. A similar punishment appears in the ‘Vision of the Monk of Wenlock’ (Tangl 1916, 13).

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mold ‘earth’

mold (noun f.; °-ar, dat. -u; -ir): earth, soil

notes

[6] moluðu mold til matar ‘they were crushing earth into food’: Cf. Grott where the giantesses Fenja and Menja are condemned to grind out gold from a magic mill. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 88-9) notes that earth does not need grinding (though it may need crushing!), and that this is therefore an unending task. A similar punishment appears in the ‘Vision of the Monk of Wenlock’ (Tangl 1916, 13).

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til ‘into’

til (prep.): to

notes

[6] moluðu mold til matar ‘they were crushing earth into food’: Cf. Grott where the giantesses Fenja and Menja are condemned to grind out gold from a magic mill. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 88-9) notes that earth does not need grinding (though it may need crushing!), and that this is therefore an unending task. A similar punishment appears in the ‘Vision of the Monk of Wenlock’ (Tangl 1916, 13).

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matar ‘food’

matr (noun m.; °-ar, dat. -i/-; -ir): food

notes

[6] moluðu mold til matar ‘they were crushing earth into food’: Cf. Grott where the giantesses Fenja and Menja are condemned to grind out gold from a magic mill. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 88-9) notes that earth does not need grinding (though it may need crushing!), and that this is therefore an unending task. A similar punishment appears in the ‘Vision of the Monk of Wenlock’ (Tangl 1916, 13).

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