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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Haraldsdrápa — Hskv HardrII

Halldórr skvaldri

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Halldórr skvaldri, Haraldsdrápa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 493-6.

 

The poem, HaraldsdrápaDrápa about Haraldr’ (Hskv Hardr), was composed after Haraldr gilli(-kristr) ‘Servant (of Christ)’ captured and maimed his nephew Magnús inn blindi ‘the Blind’ Sigurðarson in 1135 and before Haraldr’s death in 1136. Stanzas 1 and 3 are transmitted in all mss of MbHgHkr (, 39, F, E, J2ˣ, 42ˣ) as well as in H-Hr (H, Hr). Stanza 2 is recorded in F, st. 4 in FskAˣ and FskBˣ (Fsk), and st. 5 is found in Mork (Mork). Mork has a lacuna at sts 1, 3, and the text in Andersson and Gade 2000 has been supplied from Hkr. With one exception (st. 5), all sts are attributed to Halldórr, and their order is determined by the sequence of events they commemorate (see Fidjestøl 1982, 157). The name of the poem is a modern construct. The poem documents the following events in Haraldr gilli’s life: the battle of Färlev, in present-day Sweden, against Magnús inn blindi on 9 August 1134 and Haraldr’s subsequent exile to Denmark (sts 1-2; see also Ingimarr Lv and ESk Hardr II, 1); his return to Norway the same autumn and his execution of Magnús’s supporters in Sarpsborg (st. 3); the siege of Bergen December 1134-January 1135 (st. 4; see also ESk Hardr II, 2); his sole rule of Norway (st. 5; see also ESk Hardr II, 3).

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. Andersson, Theodore M. and Kari Ellen Gade, trans. 2000. Morkinskinna: The Earliest Icelandic Chronicle of the Norwegian Kings (1030-1157). Islandica 51. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.
  3. Fidjestøl, Bjarne. 1982. Det norrøne fyrstediktet. Universitet i Bergen Nordisk institutts skriftserie 11. Øvre Ervik: Alvheim & Eide.
  4. Internal references
  5. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Heimskringla (Hkr)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  6. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘Fagrskinna (Fsk)’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. clix-clxi.
  7. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Hulda and Hrokkinskinna (H-Hr)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  8. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Morkinskinna (Mork)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  9. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Einarr Skúlason, Haraldsdrápa II’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 544-8.
  10. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Ingimarr af Aski Sveinsson, Lausavísa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 497-8.
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Information about a text: poem, sequence of stanzas, or prose work

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