skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Lausavísur — Eldj LvII

Eldjárn

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Eldjárn, Lausavísur’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 406-8.

 

Hví samir hitt at dúsa
hirðmanni geðstirðum?
Vest nú, þótt kjǫl kosti,
knár, riddari inn hári.
Þats satt, at býðk byttu
(breiðhúfuðum) reiða
(austrs til hár í hesti
hvaljarðar) Giffarði.
 
‘Why is it fitting for a strong-minded retainer to take it easy? Be active now, hoary knight, although the keel is sorely tried. It’s true that I tell Giffarðr to swing the bucket; the bilge-water is too high in the broad-hulled horse of the whale-land [SEA > SHIP].
Frák, at flótta rôkuð
— falsk annat lið manna —
— þar vas harðr, es heyrðak,
hernaðr — á Foxerni.
Varð hjalmþrimu herðis
hár, þars staddir vôruð,
gangr, þars gauzka drengi
Giffarðr í hel barði.
 
‘I heard that you pursued those who fled at Fuxerna; the other host of men hid; it was hard fighting there, as I’ve heard. The success of the strengthener of the helmet-crash [BATTLE > WARRIOR] was immense where you stood, when Giffarðr beat Gautish warriors to death.
Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Information about a text: poem, sequence of stanzas, or prose work

This page is used for different resources. For groups of stanzas such as poems, you will see the verse text and, where published, the translation of each stanza. These are also links to information about the individual stanzas.

For prose works you will see a list of the stanzas and fragments in that prose work, where relevant, providing links to the individual stanzas.

Where you have access to introduction(s) to the poem or prose work in the database, these will appear in the ‘introduction’ section.

The final section, ‘sources’ is a list of the manuscripts that contain the prose work, as well as manuscripts and prose works linked to stanzas and sections of a text.