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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Note to Þhorn Harkv 9I

[5] stóðum ‘stud-horses’: I.e. groups of stallion and mares. The mss of Hkr read stǫðum (dat. pl.) ‘places’, which is adopted in most eds, and already in Munch and Unger (1847, 112). Hkr 1991 then tentatively interprets brá stǫðum nǫkkva to mean ‘changed the position of the ships’; cf. Nygaard (1875, 316), ‘launched the ship from the land’. Yet Jón Helgason (1968, 17) remarks that o in the inflectional syllable of ‘stoðom’ (and similar) in the transcripts of Fsk indicates that the root vowel intended in that text is ó not ǫ. Certainly, in any case, the root vowel in the transcripts of Fsk is consistently spelt <o>, in contrast with the Hkr forms.

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. Hkr 1991 = Bergljót S. Kristjánsdóttir et al., eds. 1991. Heimskringla. 3 vols. Reykjavík: Mál og menning.
  3. Munch, P. A. and C. R. Unger, eds. 1847. Oldnorsk læsebog med tilhörende glossarium. Christiania (Oslo): Dahl.
  4. Jón Helgason, ed. 1968. Skjaldevers. 3rd edn. Copenhagen: Munksgaard.
  5. Nygaard, Marius. 1875. Udvalg af den norröne literatur for latin- og realgymnasier. Bergen: Giertsen.
  6. Internal references
  7. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Heimskringla (Hkr)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  8. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘Fagrskinna (Fsk)’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. clix-clxi.

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