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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Note to ESk Ingdr 2II

[1, 2] þarf kenna Inga þat ‘needs to blame Ingi for the fact’: The slaying of Sigurðr munnr was prompted by some of Sigurðr’s men killing a servant of Ingi’s retainer, Grégóríus Dagsson, and one of Ingi’s own men, Sigurðr skrúðhyrna ‘the Ornament-cornered’. Grégóríus urged Ingi to retaliate, and, although he was initially reluctant to resort to violence, he finally acquiesced. All prose narratives agree that Ingi was part of the raid against Sigurðr. According to Mork (1928-32, 457) and Hkr (ÍF 28, 341), Sigurðr went outside when the house he was in came under attack. He called on Ingi to grant him a truce, but he was hewn down immediately. Fsk (ÍF 29, 336) states that Ingi wanted to give Sigurðr quarter, but that Ingi’s men did not listen and killed him nonetheless.

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. ÍF 26-8 = Heimskringla. Ed. Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson. 1941-51.
  3. ÍF 29 = Ágrip af Nóregskonunga sǫgum; Fagrskinna—Nóregs konungatal. Ed. Bjarni Einarsson. 1985.
  4. Internal references
  5. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Heimskringla (Hkr)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  6. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘Fagrskinna (Fsk)’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. clix-clxi.
  7. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Morkinskinna (Mork)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].

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