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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Note to Anon Harst 1II

[2] fen ‘the marsh’: Saga accounts of the battlefield of Fulford mention both the River Ouse and a marshy ditch or pool (see Mork 1928-32, 267-9; ÍF 28, 179-81). In terms of the skaldic verses from which the saga accounts derive, Steinn Óldr 1/1 refers to a móða ‘river’ and Óldr 2/1 to Úsa ‘Ouse’, and the latter is also mentioned in Arn Hardr 7/3. Harst is the only skaldic source to specify a marsh, and to employ the conceit of walking dry-shod across corpses.

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. Mork 1928-32 = Finnur Jónsson, ed. 1928-32. Morkinskinna. SUGNL 53. Copenhagen: Jørgensen.
  3. ÍF 26-8 = Heimskringla. Ed. Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson. 1941-51.
  4. Internal references
  5. 2017, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Ragnars saga loðbrókar’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 616.
  6. Matthew Townend 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Haraldsstikki’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 807-8.
  7. Diana Whaley (ed.) 2009, ‘Arnórr jarlaskáld Þórðarson, Haraldsdrápa 7’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 268.
  8. Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Steinn Herdísarson, Óláfsdrápa 1’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 368-9.

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